Technology and culture

“Like so many things, our technological Culture must “fail” if it is to succeed, for its very failures constitute the thing that it is trying to measure, harness, or predict. If the formulae and predictions of science were completely effective and exhaustive, if the operations of technology were completely efficient, then nature would become science or technology itself. (This is actually how we talk about things in our modern world of contextual relativity: nature is “system,” it is “biology” or “ecology,” whereas Culture is “natural,” an “evolutionary adaptation.”) Science and technology “produce” our Cultural distinction between the innate and the artificial to the extent that they fail to be completely exact or efficient, precipitating an image of “the unknown” and of uncontrolled natural force. Thus it is that science and technology are aligned on the side of conservatism in modern America. But it should be emphasized that even technologically our Culture “works” in terms of objectification, and only incidentally in terms of energy and efficiency.”

Nothing to do with HFT nor microwave, but this excerpt comes from a classic (and a must-read) book called The Invention of Culture, written 40 years ago by anthropologist Roy Wagner. Compared to this complex but very important book, my posts about HFT are as simple as Mickey Mouse Magazine. As my book company will publish the long-awaited French translation of the book in November, I have to send it to the printer this week, so my neural network is quite busy. What’s more, since the Ofcom website opened again, since I re-checked some data, I got some new (and very sensitive) information from the industry, which forces me to rewrite a section of the “HFT in my backyard” Part IV. This part is probably the most complex to manage. I’ll post it next Monday – I need to take time and be very careful. Have a nice week by then.

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3 Comments

  1. Another week passed, still no public part IV… I hope you are well and that “rewrite” does not mean “cripple”, but “extend” ;)

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